Alessandro Capucci.

Jeff S. Healey, M.D Malaria ., Stuart J. Connolly, M.D., Michael R. Gold, M.D., Carsten W. Israel, M.D., Isabelle C. Van Gelder, M.D., Alessandro Capucci, M.D., C.P. Lau, M.D., Eric Fain, M.D., Sean Yang, M.Sc., Christophe Bailleul, M.D., Carlos A. Morillo, M.D., Tag Carlson, M.D., Ellison Themeles, M.Sc., Elizabeth S. Kaufman, M.D., and Stefan H. Hohnloser, M.D. For the ASSERT Investigators: Subclinical Atrial Fibrillation and the chance of Stroke Atrial fibrillation may be asymptomatic and consequently subclinical.1,2 Epidemiologic studies indicate that many patients with atrial fibrillation on screening electrocardiograms hadn’t previously received a medical diagnosis of atrial fibrillation.3 About 15 percent of strokes are attributable to documented atrial fibrillation, and 50 to 60 percent to documented cerebrovascular disease,4-7 however in about 25 percent of patients who’ve ischemic strokes, zero etiologic factor is identified.

More than 90 % of teenagers said they’d be ready to talk to friends about the risks of riding with a drunk driver, either beforehand or when faced with the situation. Also, 70 % believe that speaking up against riding with a drunk driver wouldn’t harm their friendships with other kids. ‘We need to encourage youth to speak to their peers about the hazards of underage drinking and riding with a drinking driver,’ Phillips said. MADD National President Colleen Sheehey-Church said the poll results were released to coincide with a key portion of the school year. ‘October is a time when teens across the country are settling in to the new college year and enjoying college dances and sporting events and fall festivities,’ increasing the chances that they’ll be confronted with a drunk driver, she stated.